Arnemetia: Lady of the Springs

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It is thought that the Corieltauvi worshipped Arnemetia long before the Romans settled the area known now as Derbyshire. The town of Buxton was called Aquae Arnemetia in Roman times and was large enough, and important enough, for three baths and a shrine to be built. The only other town in Britain important enough to […]

‘TOT’ Finger Rings

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Finger rings with bearing the inscription ‘TOT’ are well known finds in Roman Britain. These rings date to the second and third centuries AD and are a group that display strong regionalism. Up to seventy of these are known, the majority of which have been found in the region of the Corieltauvi, especially in what […]

Corieltauvi: What’s in a Name?

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The Corieltauvi lived in the region of Leicester, Nottingham and Lincoln. The area is a low-lying one with many rivers: Ancholme, Brant, Devon, Eau, Erewash, Eye, Fleet, Greet, Idle, Langworth, Leen, Maun, Meden, North Beck, Poulter, Ryton, Slea, Smite, Soar, Till, Whipling, Witham, Wreak. Most important is the Trent which flows through the heart of […]

Openwork Disc Found Near Scunthorpe

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The Texas Coritani was inspired by this artifact and now uses it’s pattern for their logo. Description: An unusual openwork disc dating to the late Iron Age. The disc is lightweight and consists of a circular frame enclosing a flat central element. The decoration to the central element is typically Celtic in style, in this […]

An Old Friend: Coritani

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There was once a time when the Coritani as a tribal name was normally found in the Iron Age literature and maps. With some compelling research, the name “Coritani” was replaced with “Corieltauvi” almost overnight. Below is a drawing of the tegula (Roman terracotta tile) with graffito that caused the name “Coritani” to be changed […]

Recreating a Tunic from the Norwegian Iron Age

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A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped the tunic will inspire Norwegian fashion designers. Excitement There was huge excitement among archaeologists […]

Rare decorated Iron Age chariot fittings found at Burrough Hill hillfort

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University of Leicester archaeologists have made a ‘once-in-a-career’ discovery of the decorated bronze remains of an Iron Age chariot. A team from ULAS and the University’s School of Archaeology and Ancient History has unearthed a hoard of rare bronze fittings from a 2nd or 3rd century BC chariot which appears to have been buried as […]

Ancient Coins Found Buried in British Cave

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Digging through a cave in central Britain, archaeologists uncovered 26 ancient gold and silver coins belonging to the Corieltauvi tribe, a group of people that lived in Britain before the Roman conquest. Archaeologists previously found collections of coins like these in other parts of Britain, but this is the first time they have ever been […]

The die that struck Britain’s first coins?

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One of the most recent acquisitions made by the Department of Coins and Medals is a highly unusual object – an ancient punch or ‘die’ used to manufacture coins in the second century BC. The die was found in Bredgar, Kent by a metal detector user in 2013 and is being used to shed new […]

Leicester dig unearths Iron Age mint and Roman tile with dog paw prints

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Archaeologists believe they might have stumbled across an Iron Age mint which produced gold and silver coins for the coveted Hallaton Treasure. The dig at Blackfriars, in the city, unearthed coin mould fragments which, combined with evidence from previous excavations, seems to confirm the site was a 2,000-year-old Corieltauvi tribe mint. The Corieltauvi controlled most […]

Boudicca’s Burial Discovered at Kings Cross

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The archaeological world was reeling today from the news that a team of researchers has made the discovery of the century at the site of the Kings Cross rail development in London. Professor M. Maus, leading an archaeological team from the London Institute of Studies, was able to reveal to the press the burial site […]

Excavations at Burrough Hill: Iron Age hillfort in the East Midlands

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This major student training and research excavation project focuses on the Iron Age hillfort at Burrough Hill, near Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire. Burrough Hill is the finest example of a large univallate (single banked) hillfort in Leicestershire and has protected status as a Scheduled Monument. This project offers much scope to shed light on the […]

River Witham shield returns to its Lincolnshire home

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An Iron Age shield which has been displayed in the British Museum for more than a century has been returned to Lincolnshire. The Witham Shield, believed to date from 300BC, is described by experts as one of the finest examples of Celtic decorative art in Britain. The bronze shield was discovered in the River Witham, […]

Using burial sites to gauge the effect of Roman conquest on Iron Age Britons

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Britain was first invaded by the Romans during the reign of Caesar in 54-55 BC, which began the gradual inevitable process of incorporation into the Empire. However, it wasn’t until AD 43, with the conquest of what is now England under Claudius that social, political and economic changes were enforced in the native populations. Archaeological […]

Roman Lincoln and the North/South Divide

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The division between the north and the south in modern England is a subject that rears its head from time to time in the media. The issues the debates centre around tend to be ones of money, social conditions, family values and political voting demographics rather than of mere geography. Some places are clearly defined […]